When You Know Too Much About What You Write, Things Go Missing

writing on a laptop

My latest article on a bangla online news site sparked some controversy. Well, not to a great extent, but some. I didn’t write anything wrong nor do I blame the readers. I think, it was because I knew too much about what I was writing. So much that I actually forgot to include [potentially] crucial point.

The article was about Nokia’s offer to purchase the new Nokia Lumia 900 powered by Windows Phone 7 at only $50 with two-year contract. In my opening paragraph, I mentioned that the price came with two year contract. Readers apparently read that but still missed the point somehow. They began to argue that I was a bogus writer and I wrote without knowing anything. They commented that the price was not $50 but more as customer has to pay the carrier monthly. They used some rude adjectives but luckily there was no profanity. ;)

Now, the point is, did I really have to write that customer would have to pay each month for the smartphone until the two-year contract was over? Wasn’t that “$50 with two-year contract” part supposed to make it obvious?

Well, you know what, I think it’s a no. The reason I and many others didn’t have problem understanding what I meant could be somewhere else. It’s because we — I and the folks who had no trouble understanding — are more or less geeks. We know what to expect when it comes to anything technology. Well, not literally anything, but most things. But end people who read are not tech-savvy or geeks. Perhaps it was my duty to explain that users who buy Nokia Lumia 900 at $50 with two-year contract will have to be subscribed to the carrier (AT&T) which means they will have to keep paying for two years on a monthly basis. That way, readers would’ve known in the first read that the smartphone is going to cost more.

The point of the article was to let readers know that it’s unusual for a new smartphone to be sold at that cheap price, even with two-year contract. More interesting point was that tech site Gizmodo advised people not to buy Lumia 900 because the phone will be outdated shortly. You won’t receive Windows Phone 8; something the company behind the OS is working on right now.

The point of this post is that, because we know what we’re writing, sometimes we forget little points that might need mentioning. This particular case of smartphone with contract is different; because that type of business model is not known here in Bangladesh. So, next time I write an article, I will have to remember to make every little point clear although I think the editor, in an effort to make the article short, will cut off most commonly-known part from the post. If that happens, I’ll have to refer those readers to this post telling them that I had good intentions. ;)

Do you think knowing bits and pieces about what you’re writing about affects your writing by making you miss crucial points that readers with not much knowledge of the matter should know? Tell me your thoughts in the comments.

And those who are thinking of buying Nokia Lumia 900, please don’t. Even if you’re a Windows Phone fan, wait for the next wave of smartphones to arrive. Lumia 900 will not be a wise choice considering the near future of the smartphone industry.

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3 thoughts on “When You Know Too Much About What You Write, Things Go Missing

  1. This post did not show up on the reader, just so you know.

    Yeah I think it happens that we become blind to our expertise. In some cases we don’t even now how to “break it down”, cuz we jumped all the basics and started at the level that stimulates us. An eye-opener like this every now and then is important. At least now you will be more aware of what you write :). Good luck with that article!

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