Following an article found while searching on the Internet, I downloaded a Mac-like theme for my ubuntu. Owning a mac is dream for a lot of people. As it is highly expensive, most people out there can’t afford owning one. However, since both ubuntu/linux and Mac is based on Unix system, when the linux version wears a mac-like theme, it becomes really look-alike a mac.

I’m a hardcore ubuntu user and I love its neat and clean environment. When I saw the theme, I downloaded it and installed it readily on my computer. I was astonished at the look of the new theme. It was a total mac-like experience.

mac theme for ubuntu
Screenshot of Ubuntu desktop wearing mac theme.

I was so happy and excited to give my ubuntu a mac look. Everything, especially the scroll bar and the command buttons turned into a real mac-alike. It may be said that I especially love Mac’s bluish style when you hover your cursor over a command button. The mac theme gave me an exact look and feel. I was happy with the style and enjoyed my linuxing under a mac environment.

mac theme for ubuntu
Progress bar made me excited giving me a feel like using mac.

mac theme for ubuntu
The command button effect.
mac theme for ubuntu
Mozilla Firefox open in ubuntu. Notice the scroll bar style. πŸ˜€

And this style continued to exist for less than a week.

Turn-around of thoughts

After a few days, I was talking with someone about the linux distro called “LinuxMint”. This distro is built for windows users who don’t want to learn a new environment. LinuxMint has a windows-like theme and windows users will find it pretty neat and clean to use. Please note that LinuxMint is one kind of Ubuntu that is specially designed to fit those who don’t feel comfortable with the default ubuntu environment. Kubuntu environment is stylish, but when it comes to simplicity, kubuntu is a little complex and ubuntu is simple and easy-to-understand.

I don’t like LinuxMint because of its windows-like theme. Why would I use LinuxMint when I’m going linux? When I’m on linux, I’ll be on something that has the linux look. Otherwise, I may be happy with windows. While it is true that linux has still some lack in software support, but it is assumed that very soon the software giants will be releasing linux-compatible versions of their software, which Adobe has already begun by making its Adobe Air compatible with linux.

Anyway, that’s not my point. When I came back to home and turned on my computer, I thought to myself, why am I wearing Mac’s mask while I’m actually on an environment that is free and open to everyone? Definitely Mac’s configuration as well as the mac OS X is great. But still, it is not meant for all general people. Buying mac is too much expensive and unless you are highly professional, you don’t really need it. On the other hand, when it comes to linux, everyone can use it.

Internal softwares, such as Adobe Photoshop or MS Word might be costly, but the base of your computer, or the operating system, should really free. And linux is worth using. There is a very little thing you can’t do with it and the list is fading out with time and two major releases of Ubuntu every single year.

(Re)Action

So, when all these things came up to my mind, I uninstalled the Mac theme and rolled back to the Ubuntu’s default look. Care knowing my experience afterwards? Well, I don’t really know why, but I felt Ubuntu anew. And I’m honestly happy with the simple yet powerful look that comes default with ubuntu.

ubuntu desktop wallpaper
Nice, user-friendly, off the odds and elegant Ubuntu look.

So, that’s how my computer now looks like. Don’t get me wrong. I didn’t install the dock-like thing just to imitate Mac. I actually need this launcher panel for faster computing and there are lots of difference between this (avant window navigator) and the mac’s docky.

Tell your Stories

So, you are an ubuntu user? Do you use any theme? Is it customized by your own imagination or just copied Mac or something alike? What do you think of the reason I said about rolling back to ubuntu default look from Mac-like theme? Share your thoughts, reaction, and of course stories if you have to tell.

Written by A. I. Sajib

I love writing about technology, life, and everything between. I love photographing people. I'm a Happiness Engineer at Automattic/WordPress.com. The best way to get to know more about me is through my blog at http://ais.blog

30 comments

  1. I need help with computers; I do know the basics, but I wish I knew how to create web pages 😦

    Your English has improved a lot, which is near impossible for anyone living in Bangladesh. When I was visiting, I found errors even in the Daily Star. I was thunderstruck at how unregenerate Bangladesh is.

    Now don’t wind up thinking I hate it.

    I wish I knew as much as you do about creating websites and stuff! Hopefully I’ll do a course or two in university.

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    1. You are welcome to ask any question regarding computers and mostly Internet stuffs. Creating web pages is easier than childish games. So, don’t say it like that. πŸ˜‰

      I’m a frequent blogger but I like to blog in English, that’s why I can’t blog everything I want to write about. I get stuck in English, you know. I want to be a good English writer as well as journalist somewhere outside the country. I’m already involved in part-time journalism, but I couldn’t yet move to an English news agency/paper.

      Living in here, Daily Star is the most prestigious English daily and you need the best in English to be able to write for them. However, I’d like to join them as well just to practice. I want to work under a foreign news agency.

      Anyway, best of luck with your university courses. I’m still in high school and I can create web pages in minutes. But I’d learn advanced web development (that includes PHP, MySQL and other stuffs) after my school.

      And of course, keep coming back to my blog. Would love to see your comment on upcoming posts. πŸ™‚

      Like

  2. Yes, that’s what they say about the Daily Star. But, trust me, I’d expected it to be good, but it’s pretty icky – ridden with grammatical errors and poorly structured sentences.

    Now, I’m not trying to put you off. It’s my country just as much as yours, and until we identify the errors, we wouldn’t be able to set them right.

    Fact is, compared to your compatriots, you stand a much better chance of developing your English without attending S@ifur’s, though I believe that never did anyone any good!

    And, you are way tech-savvy than I’d expect a 15(?)-year-old. That’s why I’d advise you to not dream of going abroad (that’s a typical Bangladeshi dream). Dream bigger. You’ll make millions in your country itself and benefit millions more.

    Maybe you’ll popularise wi-fi, which I didn’t find anywhere in BD except in Hazrat Shahjalal airport. Moreover, you can work for a foreign news agency right from BD, like a freelance writer, or as a correspondent in BD for a foreign paper. Check this lady out: http://www.mridukhullar.com/. She writes for the New York Times and several other International publications from India.

    Abroad, you’ll never earn as much respect as you will in your own country. This is experience speaking.

    Good luck anyway. Make BD proud πŸ˜€

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    1. So, do you honestly suggest me not to refer to the Daily Star to improve my English? (If not, I can for sure go with foreign newspapers including NYT or BBC). Institutes like S@ifur’s, FM etc are extremely popular over here. I could never get in touch with someone who did study there. So, I’m damn confused if I should go with them.

      I’m a tech-savvy, that’s true. Although right now I don’t know a lot of things (except writing a few techie articles), I’m planning to learn web development after high school. I know moving out of Bangladesh is a typical dream over here. But in my case, especially if you could sit with me then you’d see, it is a logical dream. It’s not all about money. If you spend more and more time analyzing the total situation of Bangladesh, starting from governments, politics, educational system etc, you’d see it has no future. General people cannot do anything here. They don’t even have their basic rights. It’s just the government who enjoys their stay in Bangladesh. If you want I can show you lots of examples on in the technological sectors in Bangladesh. It could be improved a lot. But those who are ruling the country bear absolutely no knowledge over information and communication technology (ICT).

      And I’m not expecting lots and lots of respect, either. I’d just like a life with no useless hassles like we have over here (you won’t understand, I know, because you don’t simply live here). They say life is full of struggles. Of course, but in BD, it’s full of useless struggles (refer to the corruptions. I hope you are not unaware of this).

      Anyway, I’d try my best to move out. If I can’t, then I’d sure look for a job in some top level news agency.

      Like

      1. NYT has correspondents in BD. By the time you graduate university, you may qualify.

        I know about the corruption in BD. It was the most corrupted nation for seven years in a row (not bad!), I’ve seen it to know why people hate it.

        But imagine. Would the current Biman chief, former air force chief hate it?

        You have the potential to do something great, and whether or not you do it in your country or abroad, I’d encourage you to give something to BD.

        BD is one of the world’s most impoverished nation because talented people fly off to countries that don’t need them. If they stay in BD, they can oust the corrupted government and make it great.

        Like India.

        Which is my dream.

        I can’t stand BD. The lizards, insects, dirt, poverty, bribery…But, I know, if I don’t help my country, who will? The US? (You must have heard of the economic recession in the Western and European countries, right? So, I’d advise you to think before leaping abroad. Canada’s safe though, for now.)

        One day, I’m going to make pots of money and do something for my country. So that I can return to it and leave in peace.

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        1. In this case, I’m afraid you are wrong. If people hadn’t flown off, the world would never know that Bangladeshi people had and have talents in them. Even if you are a person full of talents from head to toe, you can really do nothing in BD. Either the system, or the corrupted government will not let you do something creative.

          If you could give us a new government, not those AL-BNP roller-coaster, there is a chance of improvement. And it is not likely to happen in many coming years. The main reason is that the largest part of BD people are illiterate. They can’t stand united and take a decision. In fact, there are lots of words to discuss about this. Like I said, it’s a topic to be discussed face-to-face.

          It’s good to hear that NYT has correspondents in BD. But that will always be my plan B.

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      2. To write for NYT and other International Publications on a freelance basis, you don’t need to have something like a job within them. If you write a piece that you think should be broadcast to the world (like that lady recently wrote on the commercialisation of homosexuality in India, then you write your piece and query the editor. It takes a while, but depending on your query, you’ll start getting accepted.

        I think by the time you finish university, you will have mastered your skills to perfection. Then, you’ll be fully qualifies to write for foreign publications. Even that lady didn’t expect to get herself published by an American editor. So don’t keep your hopes low.

        English is my first language (i.e., I don’t speak Bengali), and I did advanced classes in English (because I want to be a writer as well). I can guarantee you, The Daily Star is trash. Switch to BBC or NYT. NYT is better.

        Seriously, S@ifur’s? No way. If you can pull together enough money, I recommend online ESL classes in English.

        You’ll go far; I’ve a hunch.

        Like

        1. You really think people abroad think Bangladeshis have talent? *snort* When you go abroad, people are going to sympathise with you for being Bangladeshi. Nobody’s going to acknowledge you have talent, even if you can demonstrate it.

          As I said, wherever you go, your aim should be to give back to BD. To build BD.

          And the world recognised Muhammad Yunus because of his efforts in BD (not that I support him).

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        2. I think I should start right away to get some warm-ups of my writing skill. πŸ˜€

          I’m afraid of taking online courses because, well, I guess you are aware of the terrible internet speed and ‘unstable’ electricity. Right now I’m getting 15KBPS using the LARGEST ISP in Bangladesh!!! And I think you also know that load-shedding occurs 8-10 hours every single day. So, when taking online classes, there are chances of power cuts or connection drops. What a…!

          Like

        3. Well, how many person can you identify that the World knows of because of them giving something to BD compared to the persons who have done something great living outside BD? I’m not a very fond of rare examples, if I exclude the fact how Md. Yunus actually is.

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        4. Oh, I did forget about the internet speed for a while. You’re, right. Online classes in BD is a terrible idea.

          How many Bangladeshis abroad have a name? A recognition? And trust me, they rarely get promoted! Bangladeshis, where ever they go, have no recognition.

          And the blunder Hasina, as head of state made in an international summit on Climate Change!

          So you break the trend. And if you do go abroad, which I understand because Bangladesh has limited opportunities, give back something to BD. Build it to glory.

          I know you can do it. If you could learn English, why can’t you achieve greater dreams?

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        5. They may have no recognition, but they have something called life. Over here, it’s been worse than a hell, that’s all because of bloody politicians and attraction to corruption, though.

          I don’t have any dream to break the trend because it’s not possible by me alone. I said most people here are illiterate and some literate people lack common sense. So, it’s not my target. Yea if you talk about glory, then no matter where I am, if I do something great, then of course it’s glorious for BD, as that’s my birthplace.

          Like

  3. Yes, I’ll stay tuned to read more about computers. You do have a website of your own hosted by wordpress, right? I keep reading the manual, but still haven’t figured out how to set up my own website 😦

    Like

    1. In this blog, I don’t write about computers quite often. If you’re interested with building websites and making it popular, you can stay tuned with http://www.aisajib.com (it runs on wordpress, but not hosted by. It’s called the “Self-hosted WordPress”). I believe you were reading about the manual of installing self-hosted WordPress. Well, it’s damn easy. If you need help, I will be happy to.

      Like

    1. It’s easy. Remember when you signed up for WordPress.com? Installing WordPress on self-hosting is just like that easy these days. Trust me, it really is.

      Like

    1. I downloaded it from somewhere that I can’t remember now. You can just search Google for high quality Ubuntu themes and you are most likely to find it out along with some other nice and attractive wallpapers. Thanks for commenting.

      Like

        1. That’s not the standard OS-X wallpaper. This wallpaper was designed only for Ubuntu. He’s talking about the wallpaper in last screenshot; not the above one. Everyone knows mac’s default wallpaper. Nobody would ask.

          Like

  4. I find this Blog-entry (and similar ones) kind of strange. It makes me wonder, why so many people seem to choose the OS X-theme, just because it looks like an OS from a cool company. That’s ridiculous.
    And I totally disagree with this: “When I’m on linux, I’ll be on something that has the linux look.” It almost sounds as if people should feel guilty if they don’t use a “Linux”-theme (whatever that is). People should choose the theme that fits their own personal taste and needs best, and nothing else should matter.

    Like

    1. Your words are ridiculous as well. You said making my Linux look like an OS from a cool company is ridiculous. In the second paragraph you said otherwise. That’s funny.

      Mind that I told “When I’m on Linux,” I didn’t advice anyone to feel guilty or whatever. It’s everyone’s personal choice.

      Like

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    Like

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