Geeky readers of my blog would know that I have soft corner in my heart for Ubuntu — the free (and worthy) alternative to proprietary operating systems. The new LTS edition of Ubuntu has just been released under the codename, “Precise Pangolin.”

ubuntu 12.04 precise pangolin
Image credit: omgubuntu.co.uk

As the name suggests, Canonical claims the new edition 12.04 to be practical, proven, and precise. With a facelift in the interface and added features such as privacy controls and advanced search option throughout your local disk and the web, Ubuntu 12.04 has so far received positive feedback from its global user-base.

For starters, the meaning of LTS may not be obvious. But this is a release that most professionals and advanced users wait for. Ubuntu release cycle follows a 6-months period between two major releases. LTS releases, short for Long-Term Support, come every two year. Users with an LTS edition of Ubuntu used to receive security updates and other new features for up to 3 years for desktop computer. However, starting from Ubuntu 12.04, users will receive updates for as long as 5 years.

If you’re interested in trying out Ubuntu but never had the guts to do so, this is just the right time to give it a go. Check out the video below for a glimpse at a few of the new features with Ubuntu’s new release, 12.04 Precise Pangolin.

Ready to download Ubuntu? Visit Download Ubuntu and download the iso image file. Burn it on a disc and boot from it. Don’t worry, you can check out Ubuntu live from the CD without having to install or make any change on your computer.

Even better, you can take an Ubuntu 12.04 LTS tour right within your web browser by clicking here.

Are you already an Ubuntu user? What do you find best in Ubuntu? If not, what prevents you from checking out a smooth, fast and user-friendly operating system that comes at no cost? Let me know in the comments! 🙂

Note: For some reason, I haven’t downloaded the new edition yet and not planning to do so as I’ve moved to Linux Mint, a distro that was developed upon Ubuntu by a dedicated community. The reason behind the move is mostly around the necessity of Internet access which is very crucial if you want to enjoy Ubuntu at its best.

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