I think I made the title sound like a video game, didn’t I? That’s to hide the fact that mathematics is an area I’ve never been good at. I’d do math at school and college, and my teacher would always say that I need to practice a lot. But I never bothered to listen. It wasn’t something I enjoyed.

Granted, not everything in life is enjoyable, and we still have to keep up with them. Not math. I didn’t choose to study science because I was literally terrified of math. My brother would suggest that to be good at computer programming, I had to be good at math and logical reasoning. Guess who didn’t learn computer programming after all!

I did try to learn programming but I have always hit a place where I couldn’t go any further. I didn’t enjoy it. And I figured that it wasn’t a good idea to be mediocre at something. So I never picked up programming.

Back to math, after my high school, I chose business studies as my area of study for intermediate college. It’s mainly because business studies lacked general and higher mathematics. There, I said it. I hated math. I still do. It’s not that there wasn’t math in my intermediate college. There was a whole subject of accounting where I had to do tons of math. But it wasn’t algebra. Algebra made me mad. It would still have made me mad had I let it.

I don’t. That’s why my sanity prevails. 😛

Advertisements

7 thoughts

  1. That’s so interesting that you chose Business Studies to avoid math because I studied my ass off for the math portion of the GRE, the entrance exam for most MBA programs in the US, a few years ago. I literally devoted 5-6 hours a day for 3 months studying, virtually ignoring the Writing/Verbal portion. In the end, I ended up scoring in the 99th percentile of the Verbal section and (gulp) 25th percentile of the Math. Clearly, Math is not my strong point. In the US, the further you go up in professional business, the more math is expected, apparently!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Math never came easy to me, but I did eventually learn to enjoy the logic of it and being able to objectively determine if an answer is right or wrong (versus subjective subjects like language arts/writing where right/wrong is often determined by who is reading it).

    Liked by 1 person

      1. and sometimes change problems into an algebra equation to figure something out

        My teachers and textbooks have definitely failed to teach me — and the majority of students that I’ve known so far in my life — how to do that. Perhaps that’s why years later we still think the same as we did at the time of solving algebra at school and college: “Like this is gonna come in handy in real life!”

        Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s